Breast Cancer Introduction

Let us cover the Breast Cancer Introduction. We will cover this health condition, including types, symptoms, and many other topics, for instance. 

Breast cancer is a disease in which cells in the breast grow out of control. There are different kinds of breast cancer. Of course, the kind of breast cancer depends on which cells in the breast turn into cancer.

Breast cancer can begin in different parts of the breast. A breast is made up of three main parts: lobules, ducts, and connective tissue. The lobules are the glands that produce milk. The ducts are tubes that carry milk to the nipple. The connective tissue (which consists of fibrous and fatty tissue) surrounds and holds everything together. Most breast cancers begin in the ducts or lobules.

Breast cancer can spread outside the breast through blood vessels and lymph vessels. When breast cancer spreads to other parts of the body, it is said to have metastasized.

 

Types of Breast Cancer

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-invasive cancer where abnormal cells have been found in the lining of the breast milk duct. The atypical cells have not spread outside of the ducts into the surrounding breast tissue. Ductal carcinoma in situ is very early cancer that is highly treatable, but if it’s left untreated or undetected, it may spread into the surrounding breast tissue.

Invasive Ductal Carcinoma (IDC)

Invasive Ductal Carcinoma (IDC) is an invasive cancer where abnormal cancer cells that began forming in the milk ducts have spread beyond the ducts into other parts of the breast tissue. Invasive cancer cells can also spread to other parts of the body. IDC is the most common type of breast cancer, making up nearly 70- 80% of all breast cancer diagnoses. IDC is also the type of breast cancer that most commonly affects men.

Lobular Carcinoma In Situ (LCIS)

Lobular Carcinoma In Situ (LCIS) is a condition where abnormal cells are found in the lobules of the breast. The atypical cells have not spread outside of the lobules into the surrounding breast tissue. LCIS is highly treatable and seldom becomes invasive cancer. However, having LCIS in one breast increases the risk of developing breast cancer in either breast.

Invasive Lobular Cancer (ILC)

Invasive breast cancer that begins in the lobules (milk glands) of the breast and spreads to surrounding normal tissue. It can also spread through the blood and lymph systems to other parts of the body. Invasive lobular breast cancer is the second most common type of breast cancer.

Triple Negative Breast Cancer

A diagnosis of triple negative breast cancer means that the three most common types of receptors known to fuel most breast cancer growth–estrogen, progesterone, and the HER-2/neu gene– are not present in the cancer tumor.  This means that the breast cancer cells have tested negative for hormone epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2), estrogen receptors (ER), and progesterone receptors (PR). Triple negative breast cancer can be more aggressive and difficult to treat.  Also, the cancer is more likely to spread and recur.

Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC)

Inflammatory breast cancer is an aggressive and fast growing breast cancer in which cancer cells infiltrate the skin and lymph vessels of the breast. It often produces no distinct tumor or lump that can be felt and isolated within the breast.  But when the lymph vessels become blocked by the breast cancer cells, symptoms begin to appear. Early IBC symptoms may include persistent itching and the appearance of a rash or small irritation similar to an insect bite. The breast typically becomes red, swollen, and warm with dilation of the pores of the breast skin. The skin may appear pitted like an orange peel, and nipple changes such as inversion, flattening, or dimpling may occur. A diagnosis of inflammatory breast cancer is classified as Stage 3 breast cancer.

Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC)

Metastatic breast cancer is classified as Stage 4 breast cancer.  The cancer has spread to other parts of the body.  This usually includes the lungs, liver, bones or brain. The symptoms may vary, depending on how far your breast cancer has spread and what type of tissue the new cancer growth has invaded.

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